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HNL 1970-1979

HNL1970s

Central Concourse at HNL 1970s.

 

1969-1970

Honolulu International welcomed its first regularly schedule jumbo jet flight on March 3, 1970, with a dedication program for the new Diamond Head Gull Wing Terminal, one of the world’s first airport facilities specially designed to handle the Boeing 747.

           

There had been rapid growth of passenger traffic, especially overseas traffic, and strenuous efforts were made to prepare for the long-range implications of the settlement of the trans-Pacific route case and the advent of jumbo jet service in the Pacific.

           

On July 1, 1969, five airlines were awarded new routes to Hawaii, and Northwest Airlines, Pan American World Airways and United Airlines were awarded additional routes.  The new carriers, as announced by the White House, were American Airlines, Braniff, Continental, Trans World Airlines and Western Airlines. With the exception of TWA, the new carriers were also awarded routes into Hilo.

           

Pan American initiated 747 service into Honolulu on March 3, 1970 with one daily 747 flight, and within a month expanded the schedule to two. In July, 1940, three additional airlines were expected to begin scheduled 747 service to Honolulu.

           

The 747, capable of carrying from 397 to 490 passengers, placed increased demands upon all phases of terminal facilities.  The decisions of President Richard M. Nixon and the Civil Aeronautics Board meant the advent of new non-stop service from Honolulu to the Midwest and East Coast points, as well as to Anchorage, Alaska.

           

Interisland traffic received a great boost from the CAB requirement that each new carrier sign common fare agreements with Hawaiian and Aloha airlines.  These agreements were under terms more favorable to the local carriers than the agreements with Northwest, Pan American and United.

           

The 747 facilities, which were rushed to completion in preparation for the Pan Am inaugural flight, included two gates with two holding rooms, loading bridges and fueling facilities in the new Diamond Head Gull Wing extension of John Rodgers Terminal.

           

The Ewa Gull Wing extension had two gates and holding rooms completed by the end of the fiscal year, and a third was completed in July 1970. 

           

In addition, five more hardstands were being constructed for parking and loading of aircraft by conventional boarding stairs.  Each of the five new holding rooms had two floors (a main floor and a mezzanine) and was being served by bus trains at the main, or second, level.  After future construction is completed, departing passengers will travel by bus on one level and arriving passengers on the other.

           

Ground level sections of both the Diamond Head and Ewa Wings will be devoted to airline operational equipment needs and office spaces.  Airlines will begin construction on these leased spaces early in 1971.

           

The Interisland Terminal was modified, enlarged and partially air-conditioned in November 1969.  Expansion of the Domestic Arrivals was completed in December 1969, as well as additional area allocated for the interim International Arrivals Terminal.  More than 60,000 square feet of new office space was added to terminal facilities in August 1969.

           

A 2,000-car, five-story parking structure was completed in February 1970.

           

The inauguration of the use of bus trains was another move to cope with transportation within the airport itself. Each of these three-unit vehicles carried more than 120 persons.

           

To improve air traffic flow and lessen aircraft noise, Runway 4R-22L was rebuilt and lengthened to 9,000 feet.  This runway’s normal tradewind approach is completely over water and equipped with a Visual Approach Slope Indication (VASI) to assist in the safe landing of aircraft.  It is anticipated that the FAA will install an electronic instrument landing system when funds are available.

           

Realignment of Taxiways A and Z, fronting the terminal areas, was completed in April 1970 as part of the airfield modifications required to make way for new construction.  New taxiways G and L to the Interisland Terminal went into service in September 1969.

           

In the midst of the busy construction program, Honolulu International continued to play host to royalty and to provide a backdrop to world history.  On the day that the first Pan Am 747 nosed into the newly completed gate at the Diamond Head Gull Wing, a plane carrying Her Britannic Majesty, Queen Elizabeth, Prince Phillip and Princess Anne, made a 45-minute refueling stop in Honolulu en route to New Zealand.

           

Charles Lindberg, who made the first solo flight across the Atlantic, was among the dignitaries who greeted the inaugural 747, just minutes after the Queen’s royal VC-10 jetliner took off for Fiji.

           

On April 18, 1970, the joint arrival of President Richard M. Nixon and Astronauts Lovell, Swigert and Haise was celebrated with ceremonies on the ramp area adjacent to Lagoon Drive.

           

Other dignitaries who arrived at Honolulu International included the Prime Minister of Peru, the Vice Premier of the Republic of China, the Canadian Prime Minister, the Governor General of Malta and the Australian Ambassador to the United States.

           

The increasing commercial traffic at Honolulu intensified the need for the establishment of a state general aviation airport on Oahu.

           

The state concluded negotiations with the U.S. Air Force to lease a portion of Bellows Field for general aviation activities in the Waimanalo area.  At the end of the fiscal year, the lease was being reviewed in Washington, D.C. by the Department of Defense.

           

The 4,500-foot runway at Ford Island was opened to civilian pilots on February 2, 1970 and quickly proved its value in reducing the number of flight training operations at Honolulu International. Through June 30, there were 41,872 takeoffs and landings at Ford Island.  Honolulu recorded 1,200 takeoffs and landings by students in June.  Prior to the opening of the Ford Island runway, the total had been approximately 5,000 a month.

           

Highlights 

July 9, 1969

Taxiways G and L and the addition to the Interisland Apron were completed at a cost of $1,991,283.

July 15, 1969

Renovations and additions to the Domestic Arrivals and elevated concourse were completed at a cost of $1,363,000.  Completed July 15, 1969.

July 16, 1969

Office additions and alterations to the Ticket Lobby Building were completed at a cost of $219,560.

July 19, 1969

Installation of equipment for 17 complete baggage claim system units was completed at a cost of $222,754.48.

August 20, 1969

Site work for the Domestic Arrival Parking Lot Modification was completed at a cost of $129,403.

August 25, 1969

A contract was awarded for the construction of the Gull Wing Gate Positions, 25, 26 and 27, Phase 3, in the Ewa Concourse for $7,408,368. Completed July 10, 1970.

August 26, 1969

Water cooling tower was furnished and delivered at a cost of $25,292.

August 28, 1969

A contract was awarded for Passenger Tractor/Train Unit Buses for Intra-Terminal Transport, at a cost of $1,038,104.30.

September 23, 1969

Construction of an addition to the Fire and Rescue Building, Station No. 4, was completed at a cost of $13,450.

October 10, 1969

The 48D Volt Unit Sub-Station for the Gull Wing Gate Positions was furnished at a cost of $66,994.20.

October 23, 1969

Construction of the electrical and communication duct system (Diamond Head) Phases 1 and 2 were completed at a cost of $310,000.

October 26, 1969

The temporary Foreign Arrivals and Domestic Arrivals roof additions and passenger walkway were completed at a cost of $1,107,000.

October 28, 1969

Construction was completed on the Gull Wing Gate Positions 25, 26 and 27 Phase II, in the Ewa Concourse at a cost of $493,314.

September 2, 1969

Renovations and Additions to the Interisland Terminal, Phase II, were completed at a cost of $1,761,684.

September 12, 1969

Steel pipe for the Fuel System was delivered at a cost of $324,355.90.

December 1, 1969

A contract was awarded for the Ewa Extension Domestic Arrivals Foundation and Basement at a cost of $2,425,450.80.  Completed August 13, 1970.

December 5, 1969

Prestressed concrete joists for the parking structure were completed at a cost of $412,285.88.

December 12, 1969

Construction of the Auto Parking Exit Plaza was completed at a cost of $136,785.

December 18, 1969

Construction of the Diamond Head (East) Concourse Taxiways A and Z and Miscellaneous Paving was completed at a cost of $3,446,063.

December 23, 1969

A centrifugal water chilling package for the Diamond Head Gull Wing was furnished and delivered at a cost of $68,411.20.

December 26, 1969

Signs for the Interim Foreign Arrivals Building were installed at a cost of $6,448.

December 30, 1969

A contract was awarded for furnishing, delivering, installing and maintaining elevators and escalators for the Domestic Arrivals Terminal Ewa Extension at a cost for $638,660.  Completed May 9, 1972.

January 7, 1970

Modifications to the Interisland Parking Lot were completed at a cost of $63,600.

January 26, 1970

Construction was completed on the Diamond Head Connecting Link Down Ramp and Ride System Turnaround at a cost of $413,643.

January 26, 1970

A contract was awarded for the Extension and Reconstruction of Runway 4R-22L at a cost of $5,340,352. Completed July 14, 1970.

February 1970

Bus trains, each carrying 120 people, moved people from one point to another within HNL.

February 2, 1970

The 4,500 foot airfield at Ford Island in Pearl Harbor was leased by the State from the Navy to allow general aviation training.

February 5, 1970

Construction of the electrical and communication duct system (Diamond Head) Phases, 3, 4, 5 and 6 was completed at a cost of $679,400.

February 9, 1970

Construction of the superstructure for the 2,000 car parking structure was completed at a cost of $5,264,000.

February 19, 1970

Installation of furniture for Holding Room and Public Areas, Gull Wing Gate Positions 10 and 11 was completed at a cost of $109,881.50.

February 20, 1970

Construction of Gull Wing Gate Positions 10 and 11 was completed at a cost of $3,750,000.

March 13, 1970

Installation of a 4-inch water line in the vicinity of the parking structure was completed at a cost of $7,800.

March 16, 1970

Materials, equipment and labor for concrete surface treatment in the parking structure were completed at a cost of $6,660.

April 2, 1970

Six elevators for the parking structure were delivered and installed at a cost of $184,855.

April 13, 1970

A contract was awarded for construction of the Hawaiian Air Tour Service Maintenance Hangar at a cost of $292,583.  Completed September 13, 1970.

April 17, 1970

A contract was awarded for the installation of nine loading bridge units for the Gull Wing Gate Positions (Ewa Concourse) at a cost of $74,777. The project was completed on September 25, 1970.

April 18, 1970

President Richard M. Nixon arrived at HNL and presented the nation’s highest civilian decoration to returning Apollo 13 astronauts James A. Lovell, Fred Haise Jr. and John H. Swigert.  The ceremony was held on the ramp area near Lagoon Drive.

April 19, 1970

Construction of a traffic signal and miscellaneous related walkway work was completed at a cost of $4,060.

April 20, 1970

Construction of the Ewa Concourse Grading and Paving project was completed at a cost of $3,411,000.

April 28, 1970

Irrigation mains and laterals were reactivated at a cost of $3,898.

May 6, 1970

Construction was completed on the Ewa Connecting Link Down Ramp and Ride System Turnaround at a cost of $413,643.

May 22, 1970

The Ewa Gull Wing utilities construction was completed at a cost of $529,378.

May 22, 1970

A contract was awarded for the construction of the Central Fire Alarm System at a cost of $45,145.60.  Completed June 11, 1971.

May 28, 1970

A contract was awarded for construction of the Service Court Area including the Third Level Roadway at a cost of $3,311,105.50.  Completed June 1, 1972.

June 10, 1970

Installation and maintenance of escalators and equipment for the Diamond Head and Ewa Buildings Gull Wing Gate Positions was completed at a cost of $377,499.

June 17, 1970

A contract was awarded for the construction of the Ground Floor Tenant Ewa Gull Wing Building Gate Positions 25 and 26 from Column 1 through 20, at a cost of $343,900.  Completed November 2, 1970.

June 17, 1970

A contract was awarded for Interisland Terminal improvements at a cost of $197,289. The project was completed on September 23, 1970.

June 22, 1970

Installation of furniture for Holding Room and Public Areas, Gull Wing Gate Positions 25, 26 and 27 was completed at a cost of $179,269.

1970

Long-term leases were granted to Braniff International, Continental Airlines, Western Airlines, Trans World Airlines, American Airlines, Air New Zealand, and Union de Transports Aeriens.  They were similar to the leases granted in 1968 to other carriers. Air Siam and Korean Airlines were later granted leases.

 

1970-1971

 The Honolulu International Airport construction program proceeded on schedule toward fulfillment of the Master Plan, which included a 12,000-foot Reef Runway, a new International Arrivals Terminal, relocation of the Interisland Terminal and additional Boeing 747 gates.      

           

The most massive single project on the program was the Reef Runway, estimated to cost about $35 million, half of which came from the Federal Government under the 1970 Airport and Airway Development Act.  The Navy was expected to transfer additional land to the State for the runway, which was set for 1974 completion.  Model studies indicated that the runway would improve the circulation of Keehi Lagoon waters, as well as reduce the noise of flights over Honolulu and improve operational efficiency at the airport.

           

A third Boeing 747 gate and holding room were completed for the Ewa Gull Wing Extension on July 7, 1970, bringing to a total of five the number of 747 gates in service at the Ewa and Diamond Head Gull Wings.  Master planners foresaw as many as 13 747 gates in operation by 1985.

           

The initial installation of a precedent-setting Flight Information Display System became operational in May 1971.  Although many airports had arrival and departure display systems, they were controlled by the various airlines, and a passenger information management system through a centralized facility has never before been tried in a major airport.  The first elements, including information displays for Aloha and Hawaiian airlines, were functioning satisfactorily and the rest of the system was expected to be in use by September 1971.

           

On  June 28, 1971, a restricted traffic schedule for Runway 8-26, the main runway at Honolulu International, went into effect to permit work on a stabilization project under a $654,753 maintenance contract.  The schedule of closures from 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:15 to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, was expected to be in effect until July 27, 1971. During these times, the runway was closed to all but certain vital military flights.  Airlines rescheduled many flights, or used Runway 4R on a reduced-load basis.

           

An increase in concession fees resulted from concessionaires offering higher bids to obtain concessions, from an increased number of concessions, from enlarged and improved facilities and from increased passenger traffic.

           

The FAA began to implement the Airport and Airways Development Act of 1970 under a plan entitled The Airport Certification Program.  Under this program, every airport serving air carriers certified by the CAB was required to maintain certificates from the FAA to remain in operation.  The program imposed a new system of inspections, record-keeping and reporting on airports and required additional funds and personnel to meet its stringent requirements.

           

The FAA also published a Note of Proposed Rule Making on Aviation Security and began to implement an airport security system.  This new program meant new obligations for the airport and required future equipment expenditures and personnel increases.

           

An Airport Procedures Manual was drafted as required by the FAA.

           

Revised Administrative Rules for public airports, ground transportation and greeting services for hire were prepared for public hearings.

           

In collaboration with insurance representatives, a loss-control program was instituted.  As part of the general tighter security program, identification badges were required in all airport restricted areas.

           

The FAA revived a system of inspections under its Compliance Program and inspected all airports within the State.  All of Hawaii’s airports passed inspection in every important respect, and corrective measures were initiated to correct some minor instances of non-compliance.

           

Still unresolved was the long-standing problem of providing a State general aviation airport on Oahu to remove flight training operations from Honolulu International, where the mix of student and commercial operations was highly undesirable. 

           

The U.S. Department of Defense was still reviewing a proposal by the State to lease a portion of Bellows Field for general aviation.  DOD was awaiting submittal of an environmental impact study by the Air Force . 

           

The use of Ford Island by civilian pilots brought about a major reduction in student training operations at Honolulu International.  More student pilots were using Ford Island than Honolulu International for take off and landing practice.

           

Four airlines were providing Boeing 747 service into Honolulu International Airport.  Pan American World Airways, which inaugurated 747 flights into Honolulu on March 3, 1970, was followed by Northwest Airlines on July 4, 1970, and by United Airlines on July 23, 1970. 

           

On August 1, 1970, American Airlines started its scheduled service through Hawaii to the South Pacific, New Zealand and Australia with a flight carrying company executives and government officials representing the destination countries.

           

Honolulu continued to pay host to royalty and to other distinguished guests from all parts of the world.  Airport arrivals included the Queen of Tonga, Crown Prince of Thailand, Prince and Princess Hitachi of Japan, the Prime Ministers of New Zealand, Malaysia, Cambodia, and Barbados, and the Vice President of the Philippines.                

           

One of the most unusual ceremonies held at the airport during the year was the November 12, 1970 dedication of the animal shelter completed as part of ground floor tenant improvements at Gates 25 and 26 on the mauka end of the Ewa Gull Wing.

           

The Animalport was a joint effort of the Hawaiian Humane Society, the State of Hawaii and the trans-Pacific airlines.  It was one of five such shelters in the world which provide care of animals and birds while in air transit.  However, it was the only one not operating on a private fee-for-service basis to the animal owner.  At Honolulu, each airline paid a fee to the Animalport for each bird or animal given temporary shelter and care.

 

Highlights 

July 10, 1970

Installation of furniture for Holding Rooms and Public Areas, Gull Wing Gate Positions 25, 26 and 27 was completed at a cost of $50,178.41.

July 10, 1970

Ten triple unit buses were delivered at a cost of $1,038,104.30.

August 5, 1970

A contract was awarded for a Flight Information Display System, at a cost of $1.26 million.  Completed August 30, 1973.

August 24, 1970

A water line for the wash area Diamond Head Ramp equipment parking lot was completed at a cost of $2,185.

August 24, 1970

Toilet room additions at the Operations Control Cab were completed at a cost of $6,876.

September 15, 1970

Improvements to the Ticket Lobby and Domestic Arrival Area were completed at a cost of $47,328.

September 17, 1970

A contract was awarded for construction of the Overseas Departures Domestic Arrivals Ewa Extension at a cost of $6,763,000. Completed May 15, 1972.

September 30, 1970

Check-In Counters in the Ewa Gull Wing were completed at a cost of $2,245.

October 2, 1970

A contract was awarded for the demolition of John Rodgers Veteran Housing at a cost of $29,225.  Completed June 5, 1972.

October 10, 1970

Covered Chain Ropes and Posts were delivered at a cost of $6,675.30.

November 2, 1970

Modifications to the Interim International Arrivals building were completed at a cost of $45,998.

November 16, 1970

Construction of a new Office Building at the Exit Plaza to the Parking Structure was completed at a cost of $20,680.

November 24, 1970

Ground Floor Tenant Improvements at Gate 11, Columns 1-9 were completed at a cost of $197,070.

December 4, 1970

Ground Floor Tenant Improvements at Gates 26 and 27 were completed at a cost of $309,970.

December 21, 1970

Landscaping, irrigation and planting at the Main Parking Facility was completed at a cost of $39,928.60

December 22, 1970

Ground Floor Tenant Improvements at Gales 10 and 11 were completed at a cost of $135,614.

January 14, 1971

Electrical Service and vehicle flood lighting and communications lines were installed at five airport positions at a cost of $24,257.

February 3, 1971

Construction of a Vehicle Service Area and relocation of an Office Building was completed at a cost of $14,600.

February 17, 1971

A contract was awarded for supplying, installing and testing five complete baggage claim system units at a cost of $281,670.  Completed October 5, 1971.

February 25, 1971

A contract was awarded for four soluble fertilizer proportioning systems at a cost of $37,492.  Completed August 31, 1971.

March 4, 1971

A contract for a Standby Generator Emergency Power System was awarded at a cost of $64,711.  Completed February 17, 1972.

March 11, 1971

Phase II of the Ewa electrical and communication duct system was completed at a cost of $177,005.40.

March 12, 1971

A contract was awarded to Hawaiian Scenic Tours Ltd. for the operation, maintenance and management of an intra-airport passenger transportation system, at a cost of $1,523,856.

March 17, 1971

A contract for Phase II of a new Public Address System was awarded at a cost of $137,644.60.

March 18, 1971

Phase I of a new Public Address System was completed at a cost of $40,194.

March 23, 1971

Construction of Carousel and Conveyor Enclosures at Domestic Arrivals was completed at a cost of $21,644.

April 8, 1971

A contract was awarded for additions and renovations to the Interim International Arrivals and Domestic arrivals Baggage Claim Area at a cost of $196,460.  Completed July 31, 1971.

April 12, 1971

A contract was awarded for construction of the first increment of the Ewa Service Court Roadway at a cost of $55,815.10.  Completed August 23, 1971.

April 12, 1971

A contract was awarded for a Closed Circuit Television System in the Interim International Arrivals Building at a cost of $2,032.20.

April 16, 1971

Landscaping of the Domestic Arrivals Entrance Gate was completed at a cost of $5,171.50.

May 4, 1971

Parking structure modifications for car rentals were completed at a cost of $3,658.

May 7, 1971

A contract was awarded for the Ewa Concourse and Basement International Arrivals Ewa Extension at a cost of $2,312,402.  Completed May 8, 1972.

May 12, 1971

Directional and location signs were installed at a cost of $504,787.

May 20, 1971

A contract was awarded for the Ewa Connecting Link between the Main Terminal and Gull Wing, at a cost of $1,342,000.  Completed October 6, 1972.

May 28, 1971

Construction on the Ewa Portion Enplaning/Deplaning Roadway was completed at a cost of $2,107,000.

June 3, 1971

A contract was awarded for the installation of a Power Transformer for Military Tactical Air Navigation System (TACAN) at a cost of $3,995.

June 7, 1971

A contract was awarded for installation of runway end identification lights on Runway 4R at a cost of $3,973.

June 8, 1971

A contract was awarded to relocate one loading bridge from Gate 27C to Gate 28C at a cost of $22,222.  Completed August 12, 1971.

 

1971-1972

With the untying of a maile lei, the $12.5 million Ewa Extension of the John Rodgers Terminal at Honolulu International Airport officially began its life of service to overseas travelers on May 16, 1972.

           

Among those attending the dedication was the family of Byron J. Connell, who piloted the first plane crossing from the North American continent to Hawaii with Navy Commander John Rodgers in the PN-9. Although the plane ran out of fuel and finished the crossing under sail, the 1925 exploit so stirred Hawaii’s public that contributions came pouring in to a fund to establish Hawaii’s first commercial airport.   John Rodgers Airport was dedicated in 1927.  Connell, a Windward Oahu resident, died January 10, 1972.

           

The expansion of John Rodgers Terminal provided another 360,000 square feet of area to serve passengers arriving from, or departing for, other American cities or leaving for foreign destinations.

           

On the ground level were five 30-foot carousels for domestic baggage and inter-line and ground transportation services.  On the second level, eight overseas scheduled carriers had service counters for enplaning passengers.  Facilities include nine baggage conveyor belts for passenger check-ins and ticket counters with back-up offices for the airlines.

           

New waiting rooms and concession areas were also on the second level which connects directly with the original waiting lobby in the John Rodgers Terminal via a spacious walkway overlooking the airfield.

           

On the third level were the mini-bus turn-around and transfer stations.  Enplaning passengers board the mini-bus at the transfer station over the terminal, ramp down to the second level and disembark opposite the Gull Wing Terminal holding rooms to board their aircraft.

           

Construction of the first phase of the long-awaited Reef Runway was scheduled to begin in September 1972.  The first increment, scheduled for completion in mid-1974, was expected to resolve most of the air traffic noise and safety problems of present airport traffic by shifting all overseas commercial and military jet take-off operations more than a mile to seaward.  The runway will also increase the airport’s capacity from 70 to 110 operations per hour.

           

The Reef Runway is the nation’s first major new runway to receive funding approval from the FAA’s 1970 Airport Development Aid Program and qualified for the biggest single ADAP allocation so far approved--$14 million, or roughly half of the expected cost.

           

In July 1971, the first increment of the Flight Information Display System board units was installed in some of the older ticket lobbies, holding rooms and baggage claim areas of the John Rodgers Terminal.  The system started operation in September 1971 and was extended to the new Ewa addition as the structure neared completion.  Additional installations will extend the information system to the new International Arrivals Terminal and to some other areas not yet served.  The additional work will bring the total cost of the system to more than $1.26 million.

           

The first increment of the Ewa Gull Wing Service Road was available for use August 23, 1971 at a cost of $55,815.

           

February 17, 1972 saw the completion of an additional standby generator for the emergency electrical power system.

           

In March 1972, the initial portion of the new second level roadway fronting the Main Terminal was opened to traffic.

           

The second and third level roadways connecting the Main Terminal and the Ewa Gull Wing were also completed.

           

The new International Arrivals Terminal, just west of the new Ewa extension and also costing about $12 million, was scheduled for completion early in 1973.  

           

Additional Boeing 747 gates, a combination of air-sea-land interisland terminal fronting Keehi Lagoon, and separate air cargo facilities were among the major items yet to be constructed.

           

By June 30, 1972, parking at the airport had been increased by 3,900 stalls, and an additional 2,000 or so are to be added by 1977.

           

A boom in air cargo was experienced as a result of the West Coast dock strikes of July 1 to October 9, 1971 and from January 17 to February 19, 1972.  Incoming overseas air cargo totaled 54 million pounds for the quarter July 1 to September 30, 1971, an increase of 262.7 percent from the same quarter in 1970. The succeeding three quarters had gains of 129.9 percent, 121.8 per cent and 38.6 percent, respectively.

           

Honolulu International was the 28th busiest airport in the U.S. during 1971, according to the FAA.

           

The State did not make any progress in providing a general aviation airport on Oahu to remove flight training operations from Honolulu International.  However the airport was able to make new and more liberal arrangements for the use of Ford Island, a Navy auxiliary landing field, which would make this field even more effective in reducing the undesirable mix of light private plans and larger commercial aircraft at HNL. 

           

In December 1971, the Navy extended its permit to the State for the use of the air strip for civilian flight operations through calendar year 1972, and acceded to the request that students be allowed to make their first solo flights from the field.  Operations were no longer restricted to touch-and-go landings and taxi-back practice.

           

To meet new FAA security requirements, Honolulu needed as much as 10 miles of 6.5 or 7-foot-high fencing along runways and between terminal facilities and access roads.  Where aircraft park overnight, the entire area will require pervasive lighting.

           

Following negotiations with the City and County of Honolulu District Court System, Honolulu International received approval to institute a citation system for traffic violations in its operational and restricted areas.  Violators were assessed fines with provisions for bail forfeiture.

           

Korean Airlines initiated thrice-weekly operations from Honolulu on April 19, 1972.  The airport is now served by 17 scheduled carriers, including eight American and nine foreign airlines.

           

Unprecedented numbers of Japanese visitors arrived in December 1971 and April 1972.  Nearly 23,000 arrived in December to begin holiday tours.  A new traffic system was initiated to facilitate their movement through the International Arrivals Building to their waiting buses. During Golden Week in April, 8,000 Japanese visitors arrived. 

           

Airport arrivals included President Richard M. Nixon, and VIPs from about two dozen foreign countries, and even from outer space—the Apollo 16 astronauts.

           

Highlights 

August 31, 1971

A contract was awarded for construction of the Waiting Lobby and Concession Area in the existing Terminal Building, $1,503,209.  Completed August 25, 1972.

September 14, 1971

A contract was awarded for construction of the Enplaning-Deplaning Roadway, Diamond Head Portion and North Mall, $3,248,921.  Completed January 27, 1973.

September 20, 1971

A contract was awarded for construction of the Diamond Head Extension, Main Terminal, $2,871,000.  Completed January 13, 1973.

September 23, 1971

A contract was awarded for transfer switch gear, Ewa Extension, International Arrivals, $92,368.

October 22, 1971

A contract was awarded for construction of an Emergency Power Generating System, Building Construction, $120,434.  Completed August 15, 1972.

November 19, 1971

A contract was awarded for construction of Pedestrian Overpasses connecting the parking structure to the Main Terminal, $345,997.  Completed May 8, 1973.

November 19, 1971

A contract was awarded for construction of the Diamond Head Connecting Link Ramp, $1,309,050.  Completed November 21, 1972.

December 5, 1971

The Temporary Roadway for Host and International Arrival Terminal Facilities was completed, $55,836.

January 11, 1972

A contract was awarded for construction of the International Arrivals Super-Structure, $6,670,000.  Completed May 14, 1973.

January 11, 1972

A contract was awarded for furniture and display fixtures for the Ewa Extension, $167,872.  Completed November 15, 1972.

January 24, 1972

A contract was awarded for direction and location signs, Phases II and II for the Terminal Building, $666,000. Completed September 19, 1973.

April 5, 1972

A contract was awarded for Procurement and installation of Elevators at the North Mall Main Terminal, $147,512.  Completed February 15, 1973.

April 10, 1972

A contract was awarded for construction of Air Conditioning for the Ewa Extension (International Arrivals), $424,750.  Completed April 24, 1973.

April 19, 1972

A contract was awarded for construction of the Ewa Gull Wing Gate Positions 28, 29 and Turnaround, $2,810,000. Completed July 6, 1973.

April 26, 1972

A contract was awarded for AC Pavement Addition and Drainage Improvements in the Aloha Maintenance Area, $16,100.

May 4, 1972

Construction of Airlines Offices in the Domestic Arrivals, Ewa Extension, was completed, $238,704.

May 15, 1972

A contract was awarded for the construction of the Diamond Head Gull Wing Interim Gates 7, 8, 9 and 10 and Turnaround, $630,290.  Completed June 6, 1973.

May 19, 1972

Construction of the Intra-Airport Passenger Transportation System Facilities was completed, $203,945.

May 1972

In 1971-1972, the Federal Aviation Administration inaugurated its Certification Program. This was a program based on Federal law, requiring all airport operators to meet Federal Aviation Administration standards of operation in order to gain and retain operating certificates for their airports. The standards were published and enforced by inspections.  Failure to qualify for or to retain an operating certificate meant that scheduled airlines could not use the offending airport.

 

Due to a rash of aircraft hijackings, the FAA also promulgated and enforced a security program.  The security program required a search of all persons and their baggage before boarding scheduled air carriers.  It required the HDOT Airports Division to construct fencing, lighting and “sterile” areas within its terminals and to provide armed deputized law enforcement officers to stand by while additional security personnel from the airline performed their searches of passengers and baggage.

 

The impact of these programs on the State was more far reaching than the necessity of establishing approved standards and to attain these standards by increased construction and operational costs. These programs transferred decision-making on safety and security measures from the State to the Federal Government.  Failure to comply meant losing the services of scheduled airlines.  The construction, operations and administrative costs of these programs was substantial, notwithstanding Federal aid, and these expenses were mandatory.

June 8, 1972

The Public Address System in the Interisland Interface with the Overseas Terminal, Phase III, was completed at a cost of $39,978.

June 28, 1972

A contract was awarded for landscaping of the Interisland Terminal area, $24,517.90. Completed September 21, 1972.

 

1972-1973

The new, three-level International Arrivals Terminal at Honolulu International Airport became operational on May 16, 1973—one year to the day that the first Ewa Extension of John Rodgers Terminal went into service.

           

The dedication ceremonies were held May 14, 1973, two days before it was opened to the public, and drew a distinguished attendance of public officials and airline executives.

           

The new structure provided, at no cost to the federal government, operational and office space for all U.S. border agency personnel and provided quarters for processing the entries of all passengers arriving from foreign nations.

           

Other expansion or rehabilitation projects completed at Honolulu included pedestrian overpasses from the Terminal to the Parking Structure, installation of elevators, rehabilitation of older ticket lobbies, construction of the Diamond Head Roadway for enplaning and deplaning passengers, and the installation of new direction and location signs throughout the Terminal Complex.

           

One of the last steps needed to clear the way for the advertisement for bids on the Reef Runway was taken on September 11, 1972 when the Navy formally deeded over to the State 527 acres of land, of which 344 acres were required for the runway.  The action brought to 758 the total area of lands, both fast and submerged, turned over to the State by the military for the 1985 master plan.  Earlier, the Air Force had deeded to the State about 135 acres, and the Army, 95 acres.

           

The Navy portion consisted of one parcel of 173 acres on Keehi Lagoon at the southern edge of the airport; a 10-acre parcel at the Ewa end of the airport at the edge of Hickam AFB bordering Nimitz Highway, and 344 acres of submerged land in Keehi Lagoon that cuts across the Ewa end of the old seaplane runways.  Only right-of-entry was obtained by the State on certain lands needed for the runway, and a formal deed was expected during FY 1974.  These additional lands total 4,586 acres.

           

Relocation of U.S. Navy’s Keehi Beach facilities was necessary to clear the site for the runway construction.  The marina was to be relocated to Rainbow Bay in Pearl Harbor and the swimming and sunbathing activities were moved to Barbers Point. The State reimbursed the federal government for the cost of replacing these facilities in their new locations.  The total estimated cost was $1,598,000 and payment was made as work progressed.  As of June 30,1973, the work was about 10 percent completed under the Navy contract.

           

Although the Reef Runway was designed to improve the environment as well as provide for traffic gains into the 1990s, it was opposed on environmental grounds, including its possible effects on bird life and fishing grounds.  The project’s effectiveness in reducing noise was also questioned.

           

The bid opening was originally set for November 9, 1972.  On November 8, Federal Judge Martin Pence signed a temporary restraining order which forbade the DOT to open the bids.  The restraining order was granted on a complaint filed on behalf of four groups and four individuals.  The groups were Life of the Land, the Hawaii Audubon Society, the Sierra Club and Friends of the Earth.  The four individuals were men who lived and worked in the area which would be affected by the Reef Runway.

           

The order remained in effect until after hearings before Federal Judge Samuel P. King were completed, and his decision announced.  On December 22, 1972, Judge King ruled that the environmental impact statement on the proposed Reef Runway was adequate and that construction could begin.

           

Bids received up to November 9 were opened on December 28, 1972.  The low bid was higher than expected, and the problem of choosing the best plan and finding ways to pay for it caused further delays.  The contract was not awarded until February 28, 1973.

           

The Reef Runway job was the biggest contract ever awarded by the State of Hawaii.  The basic figure was $46,374,039, but $3 million or so was added when the State exercised an option to have the contractor dredge an additional 1.8 million cubic yards of fill.

           

The $46 million and $49 million figures represented downward negotiation of the original bid of $52 million for a full design suitable to the Air Force as well as the airlines and the FAA.

           

That configuration included a taxiway paralleling the full length of the 12,500-foot runway, plus a series of other support taxiways, high-speed turnoffs and shoulders extending 1,000 feet each side of the runway centerline.  The contractor was able to reduce its bid price largely because the State agreed to stretch the construction period from 19 months to 26 months.

           

The DOT had legislative authority to finance the difference between the Federal contribution and the contract price through reimbursable general obligation bonds, approved by the 1972 Legislature.  The State hoped to raise money for the runway through this system without imposing any great increase in the airline landing fees and other charges which support the airport system.

           

Total federal grants and allocations for the Reef Runway project rose to $24,022,139 during FY 1973.  This sum included the $14,033,000 granted by the FAA in May 1972 for the runway itself, $7,033,150 allocated in the fall of 1972 for embankments and ancillary facilities, and an additional $2,955,989 granted in 1973 to cover increased costs and to construct a wildlife habitat in Pearl Harbor.

           

The contractor was ordered to begin work on the Reef Runway May 7, 1973.  Soon draglines, clamshells and tractors had constructed dikes in the Hickam area to confine the coral and others materials to be dredged for the future land fill.  By June 11, a small dredge was in operation and work had been progressing 24 hours a day.  That night, work halted because of the expected issuance of a court injunction.

           

On June 12, the 9th Circuit Court in San Francisco issued a temporary injunction in response to the appeal of the suit from the lower court.  The injunction was expected to remain in effect at least until August 1973 when the 9th Circuit Court was scheduled to hear arguments as to whether the order should be made permanent.  Defendants in the case were the U.S. DOT and the Hawaii DOT.

           

At the end of FY 1973, the Reef Runway project was idle, but work was progressing satisfactorily under a $350,881 contract to relocate bird habitats the runway would displace.

           

Honolulu International was the 29th busiest in the U.S. during 1972 according to the FAA.

           

In February 1973 the FAA instituted its new security program and imposed upon all airport operators serving certificated air carriers a requirement to provide law enforcement officers at each position where preboard screening of airline passengers was conducted.  The airport was forced to employ off-duty police officers to meet the requirement.  The arrangement proved to be prohibitively costly and specifications were drawn to replace them with contractual guard services.

           

The airport certification program, also instituted by the FAA, became effective during the fiscal year.  Honolulu International Airport was certified to meet the standards promulgated by Federal Aviation Regulations, Part 139. 

           

Highlights 

August 17, 1972

A contract was awarded for construction of Baggage Claim Area, Diamond Head, Existing Terminal Building, at a cost of $661,830.  Completed July 20, 1973.

October 18, 1972

A contract was awarded to remodel and build an addition to the Ticket Lobby Area, $1,545,000.  Completed July 18, 1973.

October 24, 1972

A contract was awarded to relocate five existing carousels to International Arrivals, $164,195.  Completed September 18, 1973.

November 22, 1972

A contract was awarded for the installation and testing of a public address system, $88,743.  Completed August 8, 1973.

January 11, 1973

Culvert Pipe for Runway 8-26 was installed at a cost of $46,465.

February 21, 1973

A contract was awarded for an addition to the Governor’s Lounge and alterations to the Administration Building, $171,386.  Completed August 24, 1973.

February 28, 1973

A contract was awarded for the dredging, offshore grading and drainage and protective structure for the Reef Runway, $46,374,039.

March 6, 1973

A contract was awarded for the relocation of airline offices for Braniff International and Philippine Airlines, $42,000.  Completed July 24, 1973.

April 6, 1973

A contract was awarded to relocate bird habitats for the Reef Runway, $350,881. 

May 11, 1973

Millwork for the International Arrivals, Main Terminal Building was completed at a cost of $226,500.

May 17, 1973

Construction of the Ewa Service Court Cross Road was completed May 17, 1973, at a cost of $115,934.

June 22, 1973

Three Complete Baggage Claim Units were installed at a cost of $107,106.

 

1973-1974

Work began on the Reef Runway on May 7, 1973, but appeals by environmental groups to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. Supreme Court resulted in two separate injunctions and suspension of all off-shore work for a total of 112 days.  The Supreme Court on April 22, 1974, let stand the lower court’s decision upholding the legality of the Environmental Impact Statement and permitted work to resume.

           

A new Animal Quarantine Station was placed in operation at Honolulu International on June 1, 1974.  The facilities were provided at no cost to the State Department of Agriculture, which provided the necessary personnel for staffing 24 hours per day.  The new services eliminated the previous practice of airlines holding animals in their cargo terminal and facilitated the quarantine processing of animals and birds imported into Hawaii.

           

On January 2, 1974, the off-duty police who were providing security services required by the FAA regulation were replaced by Hawaii Protective Association, Ltd. personnel.  Under the provisions of a one-year contract, the security service was being provided by a private security organization, at a cost considerably less than under the previous arrangement.

           

Distinguished visitors to Honolulu during the year included Queen Elizabeth of England, other leaders of foreign nations bordering the Pacific Basin, Governors of several states, Cabinet Officers, Congressmen and returning astronauts.

           

Work was progressing on the installation of security fencing at the airport.

           

Elliott Street was relocated in coordination with the U.S. Postal Service for its new Main Post Office which was being built at the airport.

           

A project was underway to improve and realign Lagoon Drive. The section between Nimitz and Aolele will be improved with curbs, gutters and sidewalks with appropriate underground utilities. The realignment at the South Ramp will make more space available for aeronautical use.

 

Highlights 

July 5, 1973

Three Existing loading bridges were relocated, $305,879.

October 31, 1973

A contract was awarded for landscaping of the Ewa Extension, Main Terminal Building, $278,684.  Completed July 1974.

December 18, 1973

Demolition and Fill of the Continental Airlines Lease Property was completed, $180,819.

February 6, 1974

A contract was awarded to construct the Diamond Head Concourse Gates 7, 8 and 9, $8,163,000.

April 5, 1974

Concrete apron repairs were completed, $42,577.

April 15, 1974

Furniture for the Third Level Holding Rooms, International Arrivals, was installed, $41,117.66.

April 24, 1974

A contract was awarded for the relocation of Elliott Street and parking lot modifications, $544,210.  Completed April 10, 1975.

May 24, 1974

A contract was awarded for improvements and realignment of Lagoon Drive, $570,000.  Completed March 21, 1975.

 

1974-1975

The Reef Runway project was progressing with the construction of alternate wildlife habitats and the relocation of the Navy recreational facilities completed.  Projects underway included dredging, offshore grading and drainage, and protective structures; paving, on-shore grading and drainage; relocation of the sewer line, construction of the Worchester Road underpass, and Building T-145. 

           

Construction of subdivisions for ground transportation maintenance yards and fixed base operators on Lagoon Drive were started.

           

The passenger traffic at Honolulu International increased to 10,639,503 during the year.

           

The FAA set new standards for staffing and for equipment which are required for Crash/Fire/Rescue operations.  A reduction in force by Hickam Air Force Base, which previously had furnished all crash/fire rescue services at Honolulu International, and the use of larger interisland jet aircraft were the principal reasons for increases in staffing and equipment.  Twenty-six Crash/Fire/Rescue positions were authorized by the Legislature for Honolulu International Airport to create a professional Crash/Fire/Rescue squad.

           

The FAA, acting under the authority of the Airport and Airway Development Act of 1970, tightened its grip on both the airport certification and security programs.  More painstaking and detailed inspections were held.

           

Kentron Hawaii, Inc. was awarded a contract to prepare a Statewide Airport Systems Plan.  The project was scheduled for completion in February 1976.

           

Distinguished visitors to Honolulu International included the Queen of England, Cardinal Midzenty, seven prime ministers, three presidents, as well as many notables of lesser ranks.

           

Burns International Security Services, Inc. was the low bidder on the contract to provide armed guards to back up airline-hired security guards while the latter perform baggage searches.  Burns provided other security services as well.  The guards began their performance January 2, 1975.  Their contract ran through June 1, 1976, with an option to extend for an additional year.

           

Action was taken to implement the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). 

 

Highlights 

July 1974

Landscaping of the Ewa Extension, Main Terminal Building, was completed, $71,380.

July 9, 1974

A contract was awarded for Construction of Hardstands 5, 6 and 30, $2,366,400.  Completed February 1975.

July 15, 1974

A covered walkway between the Parking Structure and Pedestrian Underpass was completed, $71,380.

August 3, 1974

Furnishings for the addition to the Governor’s Lounge were installed, $18,324.

October 2, 1974

A contract was awarded for inclined conveyors for the International Arrivals Building, $134,442.

October 18, 1974

Landscaping of the Enplaning/Deplaning Roadway Approach Ground Level and the Parking Area was completed, $211,908.74.

October 18, 1974

Security Fencing and related work was completed, $59,385.50.

December 4, 1974

A contract was awarded for airport security improvements, $261,000.  Completed July 1975.

January 27, 1975

A contract was awarded for fencing and demolition of Buildings 200, 202, 203, $32,484.

April 1, 1975

A contract was awarded for construction of miscellaneous projects for the Main Terminal Building, $515,660.  Completed May 1976.

April 4, 1975

A contract was awarded for landscaping the walkways and roadways, Main Terminal Building, $209,486.  Completed November 1975.

April 18, 1975

A contract was awarded for the Lagoon Drive Sewer Line and Pump Station for the Reef Runway, $1,497,475.   Completed September 1976.

May 20, 1975

A contract was awarded for furnishing, delivering, installing and testing two Aircraft Passenger Loading Bridges, $357,748.  Completed August 1975.

June 3, 1975

A contract was awarded to relocate one loading bridge from Gate 28C to 30C, $18,474.  Completed July 1975.

June 5, 1975

A contract was awarded for improvements for Lagoon Drive and the Air Taxi Lease Lots, $1,457,740.  Completed June 1976.

June 15, 1975

A contract was awarded for construction of the Worchester Road Underpass, $2,433,277.  Completed February 1976.

June 25, 1975

A contract was awarded for paving and offshore grading and drainage for the Reef Runway, $8,346,781.  Completed September 1976.

 

1975-1976

A contract was given to Ronald A. Darby and Associates to plan and design a noise monitoring system on and around the airport.  The system consisted of 12 to 14 remote monitoring stations at the periphery of the airport supplemented by on-airport monitors. All monitoring stations reported their data to a central processing center that provided a visual display of results.  The center recorded and stored the results so that location of noise sources exceeding the prescribed threshold could be played back and pinpointed in time and space to identify the specific aircraft source.

           

A contract was let to EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc. of San Diego, California, to supply equipment for the noise monitoring system.

           

A large scale emergency and medical exercise was held at HNL.  It was the culmination of the long-range program undertaken to improve detailed emergency medical plans in the airport’s operations manual.

           

Work continued on the long awaited Reef Runway.

           

Thirty-one new space permits and seven new leases were processed and by the end of the fiscal year; 132 space permits and 109 leases were in effect.

           

Two 3,000 gallon crash/fire trucks and one rescue truck were added to the inventory of one Ansul jeep and one quick-response vehicle.

           

The Airport Division’s administrative offices were moved from the sixth and seventh floors of the Honolulu International Airport Administration Building, to the mezzanine floors of Gates 29 and 30 in the Ewa Gull Wing.     

           

 Honolulu International handled 11,306,443 passengers, representing a 6.96 percent increase over the previous year.  Cargo passing through the airport increased by a significant 15.7 percent and amounted to 253,124,381 pounds.  The volume of mail handled decreased by 6.1 percent.  Mail amounted to 54,235,925 pounds.                  

 

Highlights 

July 1, 1975

A contract was awarded for construction of the Gate 29 Concession and the Airports Division Office, $346,240.  Completed April 1976.

August 8, 1975

A contract was awarded for the construction of the Ewa Baggage Claim and Tenant Areas of the Main Terminal, $308,107.  Completed July 1976.

November 19, 1975

A contract was awarded for the furnishing and delivering of taxiway guidance signs, $11,925.

November 20, 1975

A contract was awarded for landscaping of the Parking Structure Entry and Bank area, $104,450.  Completed April 1976.

November 24, 1975

A contract was awarded for landscaping of the Ewa Service court, Phase I, $90,886.  Completed May 1976.

March 18, 1976

A contract was awarded for improvement of the Lagoon Drive Lease Lots Sewage Pump Station, $104,111.  Completed June 1976.

May 10, 1976

A contract was awarded for stabilization of Runway 4L Shoulders, $87,761. Completed: June 1976.

May 19, 1976

A contract was awarded for resurfacing and grooving Runway 4R-22L, $313,459.  Completed October 1976.

June 28, 1976

A contract was awarded for site preparation for remote monitoring stations, $55,517.  Completed April 1977.

 

1976-1977

Honolulu International Airport celebrated its golden anniversary with a ceremony that included several aviation pioneers. The original airport was dedicated as John Rodgers Airport on March 21, 1927.

           

Honolulu International served 12,182,519 passengers during calendar year 1976, a seven percent increase over the previous year.  Air operations totaled 320,565. This figure represented only 789 more operations than 1975; however, the large increase in passenger volume indicated a larger percentage of wide-bodied aircraft using the facility.

           

On December 14, 1976, a disaster exercise, Porpoise 76, was conducted, based on the airport’s required operational plan.  The exercise was beneficial, considering its scope, complexity and many participants.  Participation by airline personnel in future exercises would enhance performance and would prepare more effectively for a real disaster.

           

 The airport had written agreements for disaster coverage with Airport Medical Services Inc., Hickam Air Force Base dispensary, City and County of Honolulu Health Department, Tripler Army Hospital and the Honolulu County Medical Society, as well as Oahu Civil Defense, State of Hawaii Health Disaster Center, U.S. Coast Guard Joint Rescue Center, American Red Cross, City and County of Honolulu Medical Examiner and the Airlines Operations Committee.

           

Construction continued on the Reef Runway.

           

The one millionth airport operation since the State started leasing Ford Island in 1970 occurred in 1977.  Ford Island’s operations continued to grow modestly but steadily and serve to relieve a major congestion problem of general aviation training activity at Honolulu International.

           

Operations at Dillingham Field continued to increase. The field supports very diversified activities such as soaring, glider instruction and towing, aircraft landings and take-offs, parachuting and sky diving, as well as helicopter instruction and military usage.

           

The Oahu General Aviation Master Plan Study was finished by Kentron, Ltd.  The preliminary conclusions of the study were presented to the public in a series of information meetings and also were presented to the Legislature.  An environmental impact assessment report and negotiations with the U.S. Army were begun with the goal of obtaining a 25-year lease on the airfield at the Dillingham Military Reservation.

           

Nine firefighters qualified as scuba divers, an important factor since the airport has over-water approaches and departures.  Thirty-five HNL firefighters completed multimedia first aid courses.

           

Certification inspection by the FAA was successfully conducted.

           

The Civil Air Patrol underwent a change of leadership and was given a site in the HNL industrial subdivision for the construction of a Hawaii Wing Headquarters building.

           

General aviation subdivision lots on the South Ramp were completed and their assignment started. Two tenants began construction of hangars pending the completion of lease terms.

 

Highlights 

September 17, 1976

A contract was awarded for the paving, lighting and onshore grading and drainage for the Reef Runway, $9,960,331.

October 31, 1976

The State closed Lagoon Drive permanently because of the Reef Runway construction and placed a fence across the road, blocking the Hickam gate which had been used in the past to gain access to the beach and fishing areas on Hickam.

February 4, 1977

A contract was awarded for restriping of runway markers, $35,864.  Completed March 1977.

April 17, 1977

A contract was awarded for construction of Gates 12, 13, 24 and 25, Central Concourse, $4,802,734.

May 11, 1977

A contract was awarded for grading, paving and lighting of Taxiway 4R and construction of revetments for the Reef Runway, $1,452,192.

June 13, 1977

A contract was awarded for security enclosures of Gates 7 and 11 and miscellaneous improvements, $81,940.

June 25, 1977

A contract was awarded for construction of the Reef Runway Fire Station, $35,864.  Completed September 1977.

June 24, 1977

A contract was awarded for the stabilization of taxiways, shoulders and slurry seal, $377,808.

 

1977-1978

To alleviate the aircraft noise patterns over Honolulu and surrounding areas, a new runway was constructed adjacent to the existing airport complex on a coral reef.  The $89 million project, completed in October 1977, was the world’s first major runway built entirely offshore.  Great care was taken to minimize the environmental impact on surrounding areas, with the result that water quality was improved and provision made for the indigenous bird population of the region.

 

The quality of water in the marine pond created by the runway was carefully considered by installing eleven 72-inch diameter culverts to allow for tidal circulation and mixing from the Manuwai Drainage Canal. At first the pilots didn't like the new 12,001 foot runway. The FAA added instrument landing aids in mid-1979 and built a new Tower between the Reef Runway and Runway 8L-26R in 1984. This left a complaint that there was a long ground run from the terminal to point of takeoff, a common situation at many airports.

 

In a tribute to the engineering achievements of the Reef Runway, the project received three awards:

  • The 1978 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Nominee, American Society of Civil Engineers;
  • One of the Ten Outstanding Engineering Achievements in the United State in 1977, National Society of Professional Engineers;
  • The Aviation Environment Award, Federal Aviation Administration.  This was only the second time that this award had been presented.

           

The project engineer was the late Frank T. Okimoto, P.E., airports civil engineer from 1967 to 1978.  Frank was truly a friend of the environmentalists giving his full support to the environmental surveys from conception to post-period construction.  His insight, questions and exacting standards motivated the highest goals from everyone connected with the project.  In respect and affection from co-workers the Reef Runway was called “Frank’s Runway”.

 

Highlights 

October 14, 1977

The Reef Runway was dedicated by the State, with both a military and a commercial aircraft taking off from the new facility.  The Reef Runway, 8R/26L is located 6,700 feet south and parallel to Runway 8L/26R on a fringing coral reef.  The Reef Runway structure is 16,100 feet by 2,050 feet with the runway proper 12,000 feet by 200 feet.  More than 1,000 acres of new land was created by the dredging of more than 19 million cubic yards of material.  All dredged fill was placed in 1 to 30 feet of water.  The circulation channels were dredged to -45 feet.  The project cost was $89 million.

December 12, 1977

A contract was awarded for Loading Bridges for Gates 12 through 25, $3,147,803.

December 16, 1977

A contract was awarded for tenant relocations and temporary holding rooms, $401,000.

January 3, 1978

A contract was awarded for the extension of the existing storm drainage system, $998,475.

March 29, 1978

A contract was awarded for remodeling of Building 391, $295,250.

April 11, 1978

A contract was awarded for relocation of the Lei Stands, $587,000.

May 19, 1978

A contract was awarded for Security fencing for the Reef Runway, $218,487.

June 16, 1978

A contract was awarded for the construction of Gates 14-23, Central Concourse, $14 million.

 

1978-1979

On October 24, 1978, the President of the United States approved the Deregulation Act of 1978, which became Public Law 95-504. This law was hailed as the most significant piece of aviation legislation since the passage of the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938. Though the Act contained several provisions which were apparently intended to soften the impact on Hawaii, the Civil Aeronautics Board made radical changes in its policy and encouraged competition and lower air fares by all air carriers.  At the end of the fiscal year, it was certain that at least a dozen new overseas carriers would be authorized to serve Hawaii from cities in the U.S. domestic air market.

 

The FAA ordered the grounding of all DC-10s on June 6, 1979 until the cause of the May 25, 1979 crash of a DC-10 at Chicago could be determined.  This effectively stopped all service by Continental and Western Airlines, which operated all DC-10 fleets with the exception of a few B-720s and one B-727.  In addition, service by Philippine Airlines and Air New Zealand was disrupted by the grounding of their DC-10s.

 

On March 31, 1979, members of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers struck United Airlines throughout its system. The strike continued through May 25, 1979 with a significant impact on travel to Hawaii. United carried about 50 percent of the West Coast to Hawaii passenger traffic and 90 percent from the East Coast to Hawaii passengers.

           

During hearings of the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee Oversight Subcommittee in Honolulu on March 30, 1979, the problems of air traffic control pointed again to the need for a reliever airport for some of the general aviation traffic using Honolulu International Airport.  The airport recommended proceeding in several areas to relieve the potentially hazardous mix of large and small aircraft by providing reliever facilities through joint use of existing military airfields and the construction of a new airport near Poamoho Village, north of Wahiawa. At the end of the fiscal year a consultant was selected to prepare the environmental studies for the proposed general aviation airport.

           

In July 1978, the House of Representatives’ Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control reviewed U.S. Customs’ procedures and spent a day at the airport to examine border clearance facilities. 

           

Continued growth in international traffic created substantial pressure on border clearance facilities operated by federal agencies because of insufficient staffing.  To facilitate processing, the Customs Service proposed several modifications to inspection procedures and arrangements of inspection counters through the Customs Accelerated Passenger Inspection System (CAPIS). Unlike previous improvements which were required to be made by the airport, CAPIS was proposed for installation at the expense of the federal government.  The airport was required only to furnish additional luggage carts for passenger convenience.

           

Gates 24 and 25 were dedicated in ceremonies on December 8, 1978 for the first of four new frontal gates close to the waiting lobby of the Overseas Terminal.  Gates 12 and 13 were opened later to complete a $5 million contract.

           

Construction in the overseas terminal area continued to expand and improve service for greater passenger activity.  Construction started on the expansion of the Central Concourse to provide second-level access to aircraft similar to that provided in the Ewa and Diamond Head concourses.  Loading bridges, concession facilities and air conditioned comfort were some of the features built in the $13.25 million contract for Gates 14 to 24 which were designed for wide body aircraft.  The popular landscaped garden area was planned to be expanded and improved as part of a separate contract.  In addition, restaurant facilities were planned for expansion by 20 feet on three sides of the existing building.

           

Planning for a new Interisland Terminal Building was started on the existing site to house all interisland air carriers and commuter airlines.  The Airports Division recommended the inclusion of commuters in the new terminal as activity in that sector of air transportation grew rapidly with the lessening of the regulatory control by the federal government.  The terminal concept included three fingers for passenger safety and convenience with a new multi-story parking structure and two levels of roadway access similar to the Overseas Terminal. Work would also include new aircraft parking aprons and relocation of the existing maintenance facilities.  Intra-airport roadways for the Wiki Wiki buses would be extended to provide convenient interlining connections for passengers between overseas and interisland flights.

           

In August 1978, the airport was given an FAA award for environmental improvements resulting from the Reef Runway.  Benefits to the areas of the city previously impacted by aircraft noise and to the ecology of Keehi Lagoon were cited in the award.  The Reef Runway Post-Construction Environmental Impact Report was finalized.

           

Work started on a $1,075,000 contract for the update of the Honolulu International Airport and Environs Master Plan. The project prepared airfield and passenger forecasts to the year 2000 and recommended development plans to meet the anticipated requirements.  A study of aircraft noise impact on the surrounding community recommended appropriate land use polices for consideration by state and county planners in the development of zoning ordinances for these areas.  The FAA Planning Grant Program financed 75 percent of the cost of the contract.

 

Highlights 

July 7, 1978

A contract was awarded for concrete hardstand repairs, $150,000.

July 14, 1978

Dedication of a new 2,900-square foot holding wing at the Interisland Terminal.

September 15, 1978

A contract was awarded for landscaping of the Ewa concourse and connecting link, $134,300.

August 15, 1978

Construction began on upgrading the Central Concourse at HNL so that Gates 14 through 23 would be able to take wide-bodied aircraft.

October 24, 1978

The Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 was passed by Congress.  It allowed entry of new carriers into the Hawaiian market, resulting in a concentration of airlines at busier airports and a reduction in air fare.

November 1, 1978

A contract was awarded for an airport exit roadway, $8,392,437.

November 15, 1978

A contract was awarded for construction of Hardstands 4, 32 and 33, $6,154,499.

December 26, 1978

A contract was awarded for furnishing Gates 14 through 23, $510,000.

January 29, 1979

A contract was awarded for landscaping the Diamond Head Concourse and connecting link, $159,500.

March 6, 1979

A contract was awarded for a wash water disposal system, $1,191,000.

May 31, 1979

A contract was awarded for expansion of food and beverage facilities, $1,780,000.

June 7, 1979

A contract was awarded for repainting various metallic surfaces, $123,600.

June 26, 1979

A contract was awarded for the installation of a Customs Accelerated Pass Inspection Station, $437,180.

 

To learn more about the history of HNL click on one of the decades below:

 

1925-1929

1930-1939

1940-1949

1950-1959

1960-1969

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1990-1999

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